Best Selling Non-Fiction Graphic Novel 2016

Best Selling Non-Fiction Graphic Novel 2016

No longer just comics for kids, a non-fiction graphic novel can contain a world of interesting information for anyone.

Have you ever wondered if you could learn a difficult subject like economics?  Or have an interest in history, but unable to bare the dry tomes of history text books? What about the history of beer?  In a comic?

Then you will love the non-fiction graphic novels.  The format forces the author to be clear  with their ideas, in a simple format will appeal to many adults who are interested in a subject but not willing to read pages of dry non-fiction.  From beer to economics, history to your favorite new age texts, pick up a comic non-fiction graphic novel and learn something new this year.

5 Best Selling Non-Fiction Graphic Novel in 2015

1. The Comic Book Story of Beer: The World’s Favorite Beverage from 7000 BC to Today’s Craft Brewing Revolution – Mike Smith & Jonathan Hennessey

Non-Fiction Graphic Novel

If you enjoy the regular weekend beer at the pub, then you will enjoy the stories your favorite beverage has to tell. The Comic Book Story of Beer is an exciting tour of human history, told from the perspective of beer. It is an interesting and accessible look at the history of beer that will make you want to re-read it for better appreciation of the beverage. Beautiful pictures, interesting text – perfect excuse for a beer!

2. Economix: How Our Economy Works (and Doesn’t Work), in Words and Pictures – Michael Goodwin

Non-Fiction Graphic Novel

If economic theory sounds dry and boring, think again. Economix is the graphical crash course to give you a firm grasp of the basics with no effort on your part. This book is a creative concept that makes a complicated subject accessible to everyone. There is also a sense of humor and self-awareness on the author’s part that made the book enjoyable to read and feels nothing like a textbook.

3. Trinity: A Graphic History of the First Atomic Bomb – Jonathan Fetter-Vorm

Non-Fiction Graphic Novel

To cram the intricate history of the atomic bomb into the graphic format seems like an ambitious attempt. Yet, Trinity defies expectations for being able to pack in so much detail, from nuclear science to the political motivation behind the development of the atomic bomb. Far from a boring historical lesson told in illustrations, the book is an interesting look at the human aspect and historical factors which brought into being a powerful weapon of mass destruction.

4. The Complete Maus – Art Spiegelman

Non-Fiction Graphic Novel
It may seem unconceivable and even laughable to depict the atrocities of the Holocaust through anthropomorphic cats and mice. Read the Maus collection, and see if you are able to resist not being drawn into the world of the Speigelman family. Entertaining, yet surprisingly moving and believable, Maus gives the reader a real sense of the horrors of the Holocaust through a family of mice.

5. The Alchemist: A Graphic Novel – Paulo Coelho

Non-Fiction Graphic Novel

The graphical adaptation of Coelho’s bestselling novel retains everything that is inspiring about its source material and makes it even more accessible. The novel about realizing one’s destiny has gained worldwide acclaim for being sort of a self-help book in the guise of a novel. If you are not into instructional guides and lengthy wordy books, this graphic novel is the best pick-me-up book for a motivation boost.

 

Graphic Novel Memoirs and Biographies for Adults

Graphic Novel Memoirs and Biographies for Adults

Hate reading? Many successful writers of books are now writing graphic novels (aka comics for adults); including graphic novel memoirs.

Because, lets face it, not everyone is a born reader or loves to read. When a picture paints a thousand words – and some us just understand pictures, or drawings better a graphic novel is the answer.

No longer just for kids, this list of the best selling graphic novel memoirs and graphic novel biographies, is for Adults!  As a graphic novel has far fewer words it can draw you into the imagery of the story quicker – which is encouraging for slower and reluctant readers of all ages.

5 Best Selling Graphic Novel Memoirs for Adults

1. Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened – Allie Brosh

graphic novel memoir
Unique, witty and insightful, Hyperbole and a Half is a collection of comics that touch on many mundane and also serious subjects. This book contains a collection of comics, some that have appeared in Brosh’s hugely popular blog of the same name, but more than half are never before published material. While the illustrations are deceptively simple, Brosh demonstrates a special knack for capturing complex emotions and presenting her thoughts on a subject matter in a darkly humorous, yet brutally honest way.   To quote Allie, its about “stories about things that happened to me” and “stories about things that happened to other people because of me”.

2. Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir – Stan Lee

graphic novel memoir

One can only expect the man who created many of the most iconic comic book characters would be quite an interesting persona himself. Indeed, in his aptly titled memoir; presented in the medium which he has been known for, one will come to find out there are many interesting aspects of Stan Lee’s life that even the most hardcore fans of his work will be surprised and amused about. If you have always been a lifelong fan of superheroes and the graphic storytelling medium, you will enjoy reading about the man whose imagination they sprang from.

3. Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic – Alison Bechdel

graphic novel memoir

When the ‘fun’ in the book title actually refers to funeral, you’d expect a dark and depressing memoir. While Fun Home does deal with dark themes like death, the pains of growing up homosexual and coming out of the closet, it is hardly a sullen memoir.

It is gripping, thoughtful and somewhat funny graphically rendered account of growing up in rural Pennsylvania. One can’t help but empathize with Bechdel, who managed to make peace with herself and her past after all.

Ed: This book is now a Broadway Musical!

4. Persepolis: – Marjane Satrapi

graphic novel memoir

Featured in many of our book lists before; our list of graphic novel memoirs would not be complete without this well known graphic novel.

Rendered in beautiful black and white illustrations, Persepolis is an autobiography that conveyed what it was like to experience the Iranian revolution and the Iran-Iraq war as a child in the 1970s and 80s. It presents a rare brutally honest view of Iranian society, without too much emphasis on history and sociology.

After all, the autobiography is not meant so much as a social commentary as it is a personal account of childhood during an interesting period in a nation’s history.

5. Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir – Roz Chast

graphic novel memoir

One of the greatest concerns many people have as they grow old is being a burden to their children. Cartoonist Chast is the only child, born to older parents. In her graphical memoir, she provides an honest and very personal account of her mixed feelings dealing with her parents as they aged, and eventually could no longer care for themselves. It may be a difficult story to read, but it does offer some food for thought on the uncomfortable subject of aging and losing one’s independence.

Graphic Novel List: 8 Best Graphic Novels

Graphic Novel List: 8 Best Graphic Novels

Graphic Novels

A graphic novel is another way of describing a comic book, but we use the term because we want to express the level of maturity that come with these works. They are full of complex characters, phenomenal literature and hidden moral stories, a far cry from what most book readers think of them.

There have been some graphic novels which have stood the test of time and which are recommended over and over again by comic book fans. These comics have brought the genre more followers and spurned the massive success of the Comic Convention which is now a $160 million a year boost for San Francisco. Sales figures for comics in 2013 were just below $800 million in North America alone and the numbers are rising.

8 Best Graphic Novels

1. Watchmen – Alan Moore

Best Graphic Novels

The central story in “Watchmen” is quite simple: apparently someone is killing off or discrediting the former Crimebusters. The remaining members end up coming together to discover the who and the why behind it all, and the payoff to the mystery is most satisfactory. But what makes Watchmen so special is the breadth and depth of both the characters and their respective subplots.

2. V for Vendetta – Alan Moore

Best Graphic Novels

V” is set in a Britain which has embraced Fascism following a nuclear conflict which left the nation intact but badly bruised. Mirroring Hitler’s ascent over the ashes of the Weimar Republic, the Norsefire party seizes power in Britain and restores order at a horrible price.

That is, until a stylish terrorist in a Guy Fawkes mask codenamed “V” appears on the scene to tear the new order down.

3. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns – Frank Miller

Best Graphic Novels

This story is responsible for the re-emergence of Batman not just as a superhero, but as a tortured anti-hero with flaws that make him no less obsessed than the super-villains he hunts. Not only do we get heaping servings of the dark, obsessed Batman, we also meet an him as an older man, a true “lion in winter” who must come to grips with his mortality and the unstoppable decline of age.

4. The Sandman Series – Neil Gaiman

Best Graphic Novels

Sandman is one of those rare comics that transcend the medium. This is no mere comic book.
This is fiction, with artwork. This is visual storytelling, a modern descendant of humanity’s earliest art forms. Don’t let the “comic book” label fool you. This is a full-fledged book.

5. All Star Superman – Grant Morrison

Best Graphic Novels

This is one of the best Superman stories ever by any standard. It’s timeless, it captures the core of the character, and it is fun. And, thankfully, it doesn’t waste space with the origin story. Morrison tells you everything you need to know, and moves forward immediately.

6. Maus Series – Art Spiegelman

Best Graphic Novels

Spiegelman interviewed his father, Vladek, a Holocaust survivor living outside New York City, about his experiences. The artist then deftly translated that story into a graphic novel. By portraying a true story of the Holocaust in comic form–the Jews are mice, the Germans cats, the Poles pigs, the French frogs, and the Americans dogs–Spiegelman compels the reader to imagine the action, to fill in the blanks that are so often shied away from. Reading Maus, you are forced to examine the Holocaust anew.

7. Y: The Last Man Series Brian K. Vaughan

Best Graphic Novels

Yorick Brown is an escape artist; has a fabulous girlfriend who’s traveling in Australia; and possesses a genetic make-up that’s allowed him to survive a plague that killed every male being on the planet except for him and his pet monkey. Yorick is the last man on earth, and in the resulting chaos, he must find a way to help save the human race.

8. Saga of the Swamp Thing Series – Alan Moore

Best Graphic Novels

Before Watchmen, Alan Moore made his debut in the U.S. comic book industry with the revitalization of the horror comic book The Swamp Thing.

5 Best Graphic Novels Ever

5 Best Graphic Novels Ever

Whether you’re a die hard graphic novel fan or not, you will like every single one of the books on this list. They are the best examples of narrative storytelling and these graphic novels are visually stunning.

10 Best Graphic Novels Ever

1. Batman: The Dark Knight Returns – Frank Miller

graphic novels

It’s amazing how well this story, originally written as a 4-part mini-series in 1986, has held up. This story is responsible for the re-emergence of Batman not just as a superhero, but as a tortured anti-hero with flaws that make him no less obsessed than the supervillains he hunts.

2. Watchmen – Alan Moore

graphic novels

If you don’t already know, the other reviews will fill you in on the Watchmen’s story and it’s significance to the comic medium. In this book superheroes are not seen simply as idols and virtual gods through the eyes of the public. They’re seen as a rebellious vigilante who disregard the police and take matters into their own hands. 

3. V for Vendetta – Alan Moore

graphic novels

If you ask most people who the greatest living writer in comics is, they’ll reply without hesitation Alan Moore. The novel has a quite complex structure, with plenty of flashbacks, a sudden break in the narrative about two-thirds into the story, and a an end that is not so much an end as a the beginning of a new story.

4. From Hell – Alan Moore

Graphic Novels

From Hell is a brilliant, moody, and well-researched re-telling of the Jack the Ripper story. Moore takes an interesting twist on the story – and one he himself admits that he believes is false – but the point of the book isn’t so much a whodunit as a treatise on the combining of fact and fiction into myth, and the nature of sensationalism.

5. Judge Dredd: Case Files 01 – John Wagner

Graphic Novels

The iconic character Judge Dredd finally received the graphic novel platform he deserved in the Case Files editions.