Books for Young Boys That Will Entertain Parents Too.

Books for Young Boys That Will Entertain Parents Too.

Many parents read aloud to their very young children as a bonding experience. Bed time stories have been around for centuries.

Research shows that reading aloud to young children is important to develop their reading and thinking skills.  Often as children start to develop their own reading skills, parents stop reading aloud to them.

Yet young boys often struggle more with reading and frequently lag behind in literacy skills. They are much more interested in physical activities like football.  Finding books to interest them can be a challenge.

This list is guaranteed to bring back story time for young boys (and girls – our daughters loved these too) and entertain you as a parent.  Don’t stay up too late finishing these books.

1. The Ruins of Gorlan (The Ranger’s Apprentice, Book 1)John Flanagan


Originally written to encourage his own ten year old son to read, the series (now 13 books) follows Will, who is apprenticed to Hal, a Ranger.  The mysterious cloaked Rangers are trained to be independent and resourceful, protectors of the kingdom.

These books have also caused a renewed interest in archery so be prepared for a few trips to the range. Guaranteed to make bedtime story time a daily highlight.

 

 

2. The Outcasts: Brotherband Chronicles, Book 1John Flanagan

An offshoot from the Ranger’s Apprentice series, the Brotherband series has it all with a viking flavor. A group of outcast misfits come together with teamwork and adventure where brains and skill beat brawn and bullying.

Parents will sneak off to finish them after lights out.

 

3. Redwall (Redwall, Book 1)Brian Jacques


Animal stories have long been popular with young kids. Magical & mystical with a quest for a legendary weapon, these stories are humorous medieval-style adventure where good triumphs over evil.

Quality writing, in depth characterization and language will develop the young reader and entertain the parent at the same time.

 

 

3. The TwitsRoald Dahl

Anything by Roald Dahl is excellent bed time story material and should be read by all ages regardless. The Twits, with their gross hygiene issues, practical jokes and monkeys will appeal especially to young boys, hiding an underlying moral that it doesn’t matter what you look like, true character/beauty will shine through (and the reverse too).

 

 

4. Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s StoneJ. K. Rowling

 

A bedtime story list for boys wouldn’t be complete without the most famous young wizard of our time, Harry Potter.

Even if you’ve seen the movie, reading the book aloud will help literacy skills and make the characters grow in their (your) imagination. Don’t skip this one either.

Essential Reading: 10 Good Books to Read for Teens

Essential Reading: 10 Good Books to Read for Teens

We often get asked about good books to read for teenagers. Of course, each and every teenager is different, but there are a list of books that are generally regarded as good books to read for all teens.
The books on this list have been selected from the best books ever written, and are good for teens who are getting into reading, as well as teenagers who are book lovers and want to find new good books to read.

10 Good Books to Read for Teens

1. 1984 – George Orwell

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 12 Outstanding Books That Will Blow You Away)

No one should grow up without reading this book. Orwell tried to depict a totalitarian state, where the truth didn’t exist as such, but was merely what the “Big Brother” said it was. Freedom was only total obedience to the Party, and love an alien concept, unless it was love for the Party. A terrifying glimpse into the future that could be, or already is.

2. Ender’s Game – Orson Scott Card

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 10 of the Most Exciting Page Turner Books You’ll Ever Read)

Ender Wiggin is a special boy. He is the youngest of a family of child geniuses. This story is set in the future where aliens have tried to invade the earth twice. Twice the Earth defeated them, but at a great cost. The government is scrambling to make sure this never happens again by training the next set of star fleet commanders from childhood.

3. The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 15 Books Everyone Should Read At Least Once In Their Life)

This book is not only a good book to read for teens, but everyone should read this book at least once in their life. Adams’ peculiar humour also draws deeply from the well of sociology, philosophy, and science. Beneath the surface of utter hilarity, Adams actually used his sarcasm and wit to make some rather poignant statements about this silly thing called life and the manner in which we are going about living it.

4. The Giver – Lois Lowry

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 8 Best Books You Were Forced To Read In School)

Jonas lives in a perfect world where war, disease, and suffering have all been eradicated. The people have no worries or cares. The Community strives for “sameness,” in which everyone and everything are the same and equal. To help the Community function as a cohesive unit, each member is assigned a position in society. This is a good book for teens because of its sense of community, rebellion and legacy.

5. Holes – Louis Sachar

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

Stanley Yelnats is falsely accused and convicted of theft. She is sent to Green Lake, a juvenile detention facility. To build character, the warden forces each “camper” to dig a hole five feet deep by five feet wide by five feet long every day. What Stanley and the rest of the boys don’t know is that the warden isn’t just building character, she’s looking for the lost buried treasure of outlaw, Kissing Kate Barlow.

6. The Name of the Wind – Patrick Rothfuss

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in The Ultimate 10 Best Books You Must Read Before You Die)

The Name of the Wind is very well written. The characters are real, the action is convincing and it has a compelling story to tell.

One of the best things about this book is that the magic is absolutely rooted in the book’s world. Nothing seems contrived; the consistency is excellent and the world is believable. This is one of the best books for teens and its sure to keep their attention from the opening lines of the book.

7. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

One of the most significant books of the 20th century, To Kill a Mockingbird is full of memorable quotes such as, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view…until you climb into his skin and walk around in it.” If you weren’t forced to read it in school, read it, even if your class made you hate it.

8. The Phantom Tollbooth – Norton Juster

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 10 Books That Will Make You Fall In Love With Reading)

The story follows the journey of Milo, a boy bored of everything around him. One day he receives a mysterious package that turns out to be a tollbooth. For lack of anything better to do, he puts it together and begins to play, only to find himself driving in an entirely different world.

9. The Outsiders – S. E. Hinton

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 8 Best Books You Were Forced To Read In School)

This book, which was written in the 1960’s, may have well been written today. It describes the many conflicts between gangs, social groups, family violence, and friends.

10. Flowers for Algernon – Daniel Keyes

Good Books to Read for Teens
Good Books to Read for Teens

(As featured in 10 Books That Will Absolutely Blow Your Mind)

This is a wonderful and highly original novel about a mentally challenged man named Charlie who wanted to be smart. One day, his wish was granted. A group of scientists selected him for an experimental operation which would to raise his intelligence to genius level. Suddenly, Charlie found himself transformed, and life changed.

The Book Thief List: 3 Must Read Books for Fans of ‘The Book Thief’

The Book Thief List: 3 Must Read Books for Fans of ‘The Book Thief’


There have been many books written about the horrors of WWII, but every once in a while, a new story is told which gives us a new perspective on life during the war.

The Book Thief describes that while being subjected to the horrors of World War II Germany, young Liesel finds solace by stealing books and sharing them with others.

If you liked The Book Thief, you will love the books on this list.

3 Must Read Books for Fans of ‘The Book Thief’

1. If I Stay Paperback Gayle Forman

The Book Thief books

If I Stay is a bittersweet memory of a family and their loved ones. It’s told through the eyes of Mia, who watches herself being treated in the hospital as her loved ones surround her. And she has to make the toughest choice of all..

2. The Fault in Our Stars  John Green

The Book Thief books

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green is about a girl named Hazel who is living with cancer. She attends a support group and meet Augustus Waters, and attractive kid who takes an interest in her. Hazel constantly worries about her parents’s lives and the lives of her friends, while also struggling each day to just live.

3. A Monster Calls Patrick Ness

The Book Thief books

At seven minutes past midnight, thirteen-year-old Conor wakes to find a monster outside his bedroom window. But it isn’t the monster Conor’s been expecting— he’s been expecting the one from his nightmare, the nightmare he’s had nearly every night since his mother started her treatments. The monster in his backyard is different. It’s ancient. And wild. And it wants something from Conor.

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

The Royal Society Prizes for Science Books is an annual award for the previous year’s best general science writing and best science writing for children. The nominees and winners are decided by the Royal Society, the UK national academy of science. It is generally considered to be the most prestigious science writing award.

Below are the last 10 years winners, along with a brief description of each one. Enjoy.

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

1. A Short History of Nearly Everything Hardcover Bill Bryson

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

As previously mentioned in our 10 Easy To Read Books That Make You Smarter post, Bryson tries to do what most school textbooks never manage to do, explain the context of science in a way that is relevant to the average person. At the beginning of the book, he recalls an event from his childhood when he looked at a school text and saw a cross-section of our planet. He was transfixed by it, but noticed that the book just dryly presented the facts, but never really explained HOW science came to know this particular set of facts. That, he quite correctly points out, is the most interesting part. And that is story he sets out to tell in this book.

2. Critical Mass: How One Thing Leads to Another Philip Ball

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

Readers of Critical Mass by Philip Ball will learn many new concepts and ideas from a skilled science writer with a doctorate in physics. His book opens with brief historical account that weaves the political confusion that engulfed Britain in the seventeenth century into early developments of science, but it is with the work of Thomas Hobbes that the author is particularly concerned. Although others had imagined ideal societies such as Plato’s Republic, Thomas More’s Utopia, and Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis come to mind. Sensitive to charges of “arrogance”, Ball asserts that his work is “not an attempt to prescribe systems of control and governance, still less to bolster with scientific reasoning prejudices about how society ought to be run.”

3. Electric Universe: How Electricity Switched on the Modern World David Bodanis

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

The author makes a few claims that I have never seen before, such as one that Morse, in inventing the telegraph, stole most of his ideas from Joseph Henry, and I’d be curious to see how much of this is generally accepted. But if so, it would certainly appear that Samuel Morse was overrated by history. The book covers both Morse and Henry, and also such well-known inventors as Edison and Alexander Graham Bell, often showing sides of them that we don’t see elsewhere. The book devotes a large amount of space to Alan Turing, who is obviously highly regarded by the author. It also covers much of the scientific side of the story, even giving a glimpse of quantum mechanics.

4. Stumbling on Happiness Daniel Gilbert

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

I love a quote by Dr. Richard Feynman, the late Nobel Prize winning physicist: “The first principle is that you must not fool yourself – and you are the easiest person to fool”. If you want to be happy, happy with your choices and the outcomes of your efforts you should buy and read this book to at least understand why you are pretty much hard-wired to break Dr. Feynman’s first principle while you are trying to do so.

Gilbert is wickedly funny at times as he describes the mechanisms that lead us to distort our thinking; our projections about what will bring about our future selves happiness. This is the kind of information (why we’re so deluded) I expected to get from the book. With penetrating insight and sparkling prose, Gilbert explains why we seem to know so little about the hearts and minds of the people we are about to become.

5. Six Degrees: Our Future on a Hotter Planet Mark Lynas

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

By 2100 earth will warm between 1.4° and 5.8° C (2.52° to 10.44° F) according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Although this sounds like a sunny and pleasant upside to vacation weather forecasts, as “Six Degrees Our Future on a Hotter Planet” by Mark Lynas soberly notes, the consequences range from the inconvenient to the inconceivable as massive rockslides reshape the Alps, atoll nations across the Pacific are inundated, species extinction accelerates, and entire ecosystems collapse. The web of life – humanity’s safety net – will disappear, stranding us on an essentially alien planet.

6. The Age of Wonder: How the Romantic Generation Discovered the Beauty and Terror of Science Richard Holmes

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

I have found the history of British science to be one of the best ways to study the intellectual history of the 19th century. This book, which focuses upon the period between Captain Cook’s first voyage in 1768 and Darwin’s Beagle journey in 1831,takes the story of British science back a bit earlier, and explains some of the important precursor developments to the later dazzling Victorian period. Along the way, the profession of scientific researcher emerged as well as some of our basic ideas about scientific progress.

7. Life Ascending: The Ten Great Inventions of Evolution Nick Lane


10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

In this wonderful book, Lane (Power, Sex, Suicide), a biochemist at University College London, asks an intriguing and simple question: what were the great biological inventions that led to Earth as we know it. (He is quick to point out that by œinvention, he refers to nature’s own creativity, not to intelligent design.) Lane argues that there are 10 such inventions and explores the evolution of each. Not surprisingly, each of the 10—the origin of life, the creation of DNA, photosynthesis, the evolution of complex cells, sex, movement, sight, warm bloodedness, consciousness and death—is intricate, its origins swirling in significant controversy. Drawing on cutting-edge science, Lane does a masterful job of explaining the science of each, distinguishing what is fairly conclusively known and what is currently reasonable conjecture.

8. The Wavewatcher’s Companion – Gavin Pretor-Pinney

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

One bright February afternoon on a beach in Cornwall, GavinPretor-Pinney took a break from cloudspotting and started watching thewaves rolling into shore. Mesmerised, he wondered where they had comefrom, and decided to find out. He soon realised that waves don’t justappear on the ocean, they are everywhere around us, and our livesdepend on them.

One bright February afternoon on a beach in Cornwall, GavinPretor-Pinney took a break from cloudspotting and started watching thewaves rolling into shore. Mesmerised, he wondered where they had comefrom, and decided to find out. He soon realised that waves don’t justappear on the ocean, they are everywhere around us, and our livesdepend on them.From the rippling beats of our hearts, to the movement of food throughour digestive tracts and of signals across our brains, waves are thetransport systems of our bodies.

9. The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood James Gleick

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

James Gleick, a prominent journalist, biographer of scientists and explainer of physics has usefully turned his attention to the single most important phenomena of the twenty-first century, the study and quantification of information. Gleick provides biographical sketches of lesser known figures in the history of information such as Robert Caudrey compiler of the first known English dictionary and John F. Carrington chronicler of “The Talking Drums of Africa“; he (Gleick) gives fuller personal histories of Samuel F. Morse, Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace; Gleick reserves the most extensive biographical treatment for those who “mathematized” the phenomena of information: Claude Shannon and Alan Turing.

10. The Particle at the End of the Universe: How the Hunt for the Higgs Boson Leads Us to the Edge of a New World Sean Carroll

10 Winners of the Royal Society for Science Books

Many of us remember where we were during key world events; particle physicists would likely remember where they were on July 4, 2012. That was the day the Higgs boson was discovered at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva. By any measure it was one of the most momentous discoveries in physics, perhaps in all of science. But what exactly is the Higgs Boson? Why is it important? And how was it discovered? In this engaging and informative book Caltech physicist Sean Carroll sheds light on all these aspects of the Higgs discovery.

For more information on the Royal Society for Science Books Prize, check here.